WHO characterizes COVID-19 as a pandemic | World Health Organization

A new coronavirus disease (COVID-19) Solidarity Response Fund will raise money from a wide range of donors to support the work of the World Health Organization (WHO) and partners to help countries respond to the COVID-19 pandemic. The fund, the first-of-its-kind, enables private individuals, corporations and institutions anywhere in the world to come together to directly contribute to global response efforts, and has been created by the United Nations Foundation and the Swiss Philanthropy Foundation, together with WHO. 

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Stocks plummet as Dow and FTSE 100 see worst day since 1987  | INDEPENDENT

Shares around the world have plunged as investors fear the spread of the coronavirus will destroy economic growth with government action insufficient to arrest the decline. The main UK index dropped more than 10% in its worst day since 1987. In the US, the Dow and S&P 500 were also hit by their steepest daily falls since 1987.

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Christine Lagarde under fire for ECB coronavirus response  | THE GUARDIAN

European Central Bank boss, Christine Lagarde, has come under fire after she refused to echo her predecessor and say the bank would do whatever it takes to protect the eurozone from a recession triggered by the coronavirus outbreak. The normally sure-footed Lagarde, speaking after the ECB put in place measures to support commercial bank lending, suggested it was the responsibility of governments to protect highly indebted eurozone countries rather than the central bank.

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Asian governments announce measures to help virus-hit economies | Al Jazeera 

Asian policymakers stepped up efforts on Friday to curb the economic effects of the virus pandemic, pumping billions of dollars into money markets and announcing other stimulus measures.

The Bank of Japan (BOJ) said it would buy 200 billion yen ($1.9bn) of Japanese government bonds with five to 10 years to maturity in an unscheduled move, as the local debt market capitulated to investors’ rush for liquidity.

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Is this the digital future for Bank of England banknotes? | BBC

The Bank of England is considering the introduction of electronic banknotes for use by consumers and businesses. Governor Mark Carney said: “We are in the middle of a revolution in payments,” saying the Bank must look into how electronic money could work. He said this would complement, not replace, paper banknotes while people still wanted physical cash.But it could open the door to programmable money to integrate with home appliances or the tax system.

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